As Published on The Innovator

Jennifer Schenker lists us as one of the 14 most transformative technologies to watch.

A U.S. company called Cana Technology has just raised $30 million in seed funding to “print” juice, coffee, seltzer and cocktails. The Redwood City company has developed a toaster oven-sized prototype machine that creates the drinks from the molecules that comprise them. Using a single cartridge filled with flavor compounds that it claims can make a nearly infinite number of drinks: “We know we can print an infinite number of beverages from a few core flavor compounds,” says food tech entrepreneur and investor Dave Friedberg.

February 27, 2022

The 14 Transformative Technologies To Watch This Year

Original Article • January 28, 2022 • Jennifer L. Schenker

Coming To A Household Near You: A Molecular Drink Printer That Can Make Nearly Any Kind Of Beverage

A U.S. company called Cana Technology has just raised $30 million in seed funding to “print” juice, coffee, seltzer and cocktails. The Redwood City company has developed a toaster oven-sized prototype machine that creates the drinks from the molecules that comprise them. Using a single cartridge filled with flavor compounds that it claims can make a nearly infinite number of drinks: “We know we can print an infinite number of beverages from a few core flavor compounds,” says food tech entrepreneur and investor Dave Friedberg.We know we can do this across many existing beverage categories — juice, soda, hard seltzer, cocktails, wine, tea, coffee, and beer. Consumer taste testing panels score our printed beverages at the same or better taste levels as commercially available alternatives. Our hardware designs will print beverages quickly and accurately. Our pricing and the footprint of our hardware can yield significant savings and advantages for most households.” In Friedberg’s blog post about Cana, he talks about how this new appliance is part of a larger trend towards decentralized manufacturing. Making a molecular beverage printer meant inventing a new kind of supply chain. Provided that the printers can use materials mostly sourced locally (i.e. tap water), we can replace old industrial supply chains with ones that are more nimble and more redundant, moving production to the point of consumption — the home. This new decentralized supply chain would use less energy and less carbon and cost less to operate, sourcing and shipping only the flavor compounds that make up the 1% of each beverage, rather than all the water and packaging.”